Beginner Brush Lettering Kit is back in stock + something new!

Have you been thinking about learning brush lettering, but aren’t completely sure where to begin? In January I created the Beginner Brush Lettering Kit, which has 40 pages packed with tips & practice pages.

This book can be purchased as a digital download or a physical copy which comes with one or two brush pens that are great for beginners!

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I created this booklet after I started getting asked frequently the best pens for beginners and how to get started! This book has been one of my favorite things that I’ve made so far. And now, I’ve decided that I think it’s time to do a continuation.

I am now working on an Intermediate Lettering Kit, which will feature the “next steps” in lettering. This will address the difficult letters, spacing, and connecting your letters together. These are some of the items that seem to be difficult once you’ve gotten the letter forms down. I plan to address all the letters that we hate & hope to encourage you to keep on trying!

Want to be the first to hear about this new kit? Be sure to subscribe to my e-mail list. This can be done by clicking the picture below!

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Have a question about lettering? Be sure to send me a message or leave your questions in a comment below!

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Brush Pen Spotlight: Zig Clean Color

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In my last post I listed what I think are three of the best brush pens for beginning letterers. Click here to check that out if you want to see!

I thought I would highlight some of my favorite things about each of these pens by doing brush pen spotlights!

First up is the Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pen (longest name ever, I know).

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The tip of this pen is made with actual bristles – so you are able to get a very brush-like look without having to dip your “brush” into ink over and over. How you use the pen controls the amount of white space is included in your lettering.

Something that I LOVE about this pen is the fact that you can create so many different styles with this one pen. Your lines can be thick or thin, fully pigmented or given a brushed texture, and there are plenty of colors to choose from!

Here are some examples of the various types of lettering that can be achieved using the same pen (simply in different colors):

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The whole reason letterers tend to buy a lot of different kinds of brush pens is to get a new look in their lettering. That’s what makes this pen so amazing! In one single pen, there are so many different styles of letters possible!

The way to create such different letters?
– Vary in the amount of pressure used on your down strokes.
– Use a greater/lesser area of the (side of the) brush tip when creating strokes
– Leave more space between your letters
– Write slowly so that the pigment flows evenly throughout your letters (for more of a pen look)
– Write quickly, not waiting for the ink to catch up to get more of a brush look to the lettering (see red letters above writing “brush” for an example of this)

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Now, these pens are called Zig Clean Colors- so I know you’d expect there to be a lot of different colors. These colors are vibrant and very fun, as well!

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You can purchase a set of 12 pens like the one that I have for the variety shown above – minus the black pen, which is also included!

Like I said in the previous post, this pen was a unanimous favorite among my friends who were beginners interested in trying out different brush pens. It’s size is a big reason why it’s so easy to learn with. This pen is quite small in comparison to other brush pens and the tip is short. The shorter the tip of a pen, the easier it is for beginners to manage (for the most part). It will help you to master the muscle memory of lettering. These pens aren’t only for beginners, though. As you begin to increase in your lettering knowledge, it becomes more fun to play with them and see what different styles you are able to create!

What do you think of the Zig Clean Color’s? Have you tried them already? Or do you think there is a better beginner pen out there? Let me know!

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Lettering With Crayola Markers

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The Best Brush Pens For Beginners

The THREE best brush pens for beginners.

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One of the questions that I get asked the most frequently is, “What are the best brush pens for beginners?”. I thought I would help you guys out and show you the three brush pens that I think are the best for beginners and some reasons why I think so! You may already have seen that I think it’s easiest (and cheapest!) to start lettering with the Crayola markers you may already have around at home- but that doesn’t mean that I don’t have brush pen recommendations!

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  1. Pentel Fude Touch
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    This is my absolute #1 favorite brush pen that I will recommend very first if you ask me this question. Why? Because this pen is small & easy to manage, but it creates beautiful letters. I love that I can write more words in a smaller area because of this little pen! The tip is firm enough that it is great for beginners, but still has a brush pen’s flexibility. The size makes it easy to manage & it even comes in various colors if you’re looking to try something different!
  2. Zig Clean Color
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    This brush pen was a total surprise to me. I had never heard of it, but I received a 12-pack of them for Christmas! I loved that they came in so many colors, they are small, and they have real bristles for the tip! It’s like using a brush, but you never have to dip it back into the ink. You can many different styles of lettering out of this vibrant pen! I had a group of friends over to try out all of the different kinds of brush pens that I have and this was most often the favorite!
  3. Tombow Fudenosuke Soft Tip
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    This brush pen is similar to the Pentel Fude Touch (#1), but comes in both Soft Tip or Hard Tip. I have not tried the hard tip, but I do love the soft tip! This pen is almost the exact same size as the Pentel, but the tip is just slightly bigger. I like that it is small & easy to use, especially for beginners. It allows for beginners to get a handle on the way to hold the pen and what kind of pressure to use without fear of bending the tip because it’s so small. This pen can handle a lot of the pressure of you learning a new skill and won’t get ruined if you make a few beginner mistakes!Hopefully these mini-descriptions have been helpful so that you can hear about three different pens that you probably see most often on my Instagram page!

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Step 2: Start Lettering with Crayola Markers!

Lettering With Crayola Markers

Did you miss the first step? Click here to start with step one!

So, you’ve got your Crayola markers* now. And I know what you were thinking…I had no idea that you could letter with Crayola markers when I first started! I thought that you had to have fancy brush pens to even remotely start brush lettering!

SO. Go grab those Crayola markers again. This time you’re going to create a few different kinds of strokes. These are the strokes that are a tiny little piece of the Beginner Brush Lettering Kit. You’re going to start with those first thin & thick strokes that I mentioned and then move to some new strokes!

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Now, I thought that perhaps you’re wondering HOW to create those thin and thick lines with a Crayola marker. I was right there with you, too! BUT hopefully this will help you.

When you are creating a THICK line you want to angle the pen (like shown in the photo below) so that a greater area of the pen will be touching the paper! You don’t want to use the tip and push the tip down for a thicker line- this won’t work as you will probably just bleed through the paper! If you tip the pen to the side, you’ll naturally be able to create a thicker line because there is a greater area to work with!

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When you are creating a THIN line you can use the tip of the Crayola marker!

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So, here’s another important tip about lettering…

You do NOT need to be writing fast. The pace of lettering is much slower than writing in cursive. You can take your time transitioning between those thin and thick strokes. Take your time creating each letter (we will talk about building letters soon, but not quite yet!). Don’t feel like you need to write fast when you are lettering because it is actually a much slower process than you might think!

AND most important of all, be nice to yourself! You are learning something new and you won’t become a professional overnight! Have some grace with yourself and enjoy the process of learning a new skill. Have some of your friends join you in learning this new skill & encourage each other as you finally start to like the lines (or letters!) you create!

What’s next?!
Use the Basic Strokes to Build Letters
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Let’s Compare Brush Pens!

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When I first started hand lettering, I was eager to try any kind of brush pen that I could get my hands on. I knew nothing about them and had absolutely no idea what I was looking for. I didn’t even know how to use them once I had them, but I was excited to try them out! Because of this lack of knowledge & skill on my part, I ended up ruining a lot of my pens. Yikes! Brush pens tend to be quite easy to mess up, especially when you have no idea what you are doing. I feel as though I’ve messed up enough brush pens that I can now help others avoid that step in their own lettering journey! I’ve decided to give you a little comparison between 7 of these brush pens that I own:

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Pens (top to bottom): Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pen, Pentel Fude Touch, Pigma Brush, Koi Water Brush Fine Tip, Pentel Color Brush, Tombow Fudenosuke Soft Tip, Tombow Dual Brush Pen.

I’ve decided to look at the same elements for each pen, plus a little bit of my own personal thoughts about them. I will be looking at:
Difficulty: Beginner, Intermediate, or Advanced. This should help you determine if you’re ‘ready’ for this pen. If you’re really adventurous, then you can surely ignore this recommendation!
Tip: Bristles, Fairly Flexible, Mildly Flexible, or Extremely Flexible. This will let you know the kind of tip the pen has. Is it like an actual paint brush or a more firm, pointed brush tip. Different kinds of pens will create very unique lettering styles and you want to be sure the pens you buy have the look you’re hoping for!
Colors: Are these pens available in various colors or only black & white? If you’re looking for bright colors, then some of these pens will not be the ones for you!

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  1. Zig Clean Color Real Brush Pen
    I got this one as a Christmas gift, but I found a link to it here.
    Difficulty: Beginner/Intermediate
    Tip: Bristles, Very Flexible
    Colors: Various
    Recommendation: These pens are wonderful! They were a hit with some of my beginner friends because they are like a real paint brush, but the tip is short so it’s easier to manage. The ink runs smoothly & you can get some beautiful thin/thick lines! I would recommend these, especially because they come in so many fun colors!
  2. Pentel Fude Touch
    Purchased from: Jet Pens
    Difficulty: Beginner
    Tip: Short, Mildly Flexible
    Colors: Various
    Recommendation: I LOVE this pen. I wish that I had known about it when I started lettering! It is small, easy to manage, and creates gorgeous lettering! It’s very similar to the Tombow Fudenosuke (#6 on this list!), but for some reason I tend to lean toward this pen more! I love that it comes in various colors, as well!
  3. Pigma Brush
    Purchased from: Hobby Lobby (I bought it in the store, but added a link in case you want to see it!)
    Difficulty: Intermediate
    Tip: Long, Fairly Flexible
    Colors: I’ve only seen it in black!
    Recommendation: I personally don’t like this pen very much because I feel that it frays no matter what kind of paper you use it on. I’ve only used it on printer paper & it has already lost it’s shape. That’s a bummer because I like my upstrokes to be nice and thin, but a frayed pen creates larger upstrokes & white spots!
  4. Koi Water Brush – Small
    Purchased from: Hobby Lobby
    Difficulty: Advanced
    Tip: Bristles, Extremely Flexible
    Color: Doesn’t have a color. This pen is meant to be filled with water, I filled it with Sumi Ink instead.
    Recommendation: I personally do not like this pen at all. I prefer the Pentel Aquash Water Brush Pen (not featured in this article, but I may do a whole post on that pen!) This pen is very difficult to manage & does not easily flow across the page. I like having the ink right in the barrel, but rarely use this pen because it is frustrating to work with. The tip is very thin & long. I find this makes it hard to create transitions between thin and thick lines.
  5. Pentel Color Brush
    Purchased from: Paper Ink Arts
    Difficulty: Intermediate
    Tip: Bristles, Very Flexible
    Color: Various, most often found in black
    Recommendation: Another favorite pen of mine! I have to say, Pentel makes wonderful brush pens. I love this pen. It’s unique because the ink must be squeezed through the barrel of the pen up into the bristles. You have to be mindful of your ink usage and remember to squeeze the pen so you don’t run out of ink in the middle of a word! I highly recommend this pen!
  6. Tombow Fudenosuke Soft Tip
    Purchased from: Jet Pens
    Difficulty: Beginner
    Tip: Short, Mildly Flexible
    Color: Black
    Recommendation: I recommend this pen for beginners! It is a portable, small pen and creates gorgeous thin/thick lines! You will be writing a lot smaller than you might with some of these other brush pens, so it’s good for details or pieces with a lot of words! This pen is very similar to the Pentel Fude Touch & I recommend trying them both to see which one you like more!
  7. Tombow Dual Brush Pen
    Purchased from: Blick Arts Store, Jet Pens, Tombow USA
    Difficulty: Intermediate/Advanced
    Tip: Long, Very Flexible
    Color: Various, can be blended to create even more colors!
    Recommendation: If you’ve been researching hand lettering, then you have likely seen a LOT of this pen. It creates some gorgeous lettering & is well-loved by many seasoned letterers. These pens are very difficult to use, especially for beginners! I wouldn’t recommend it as your first pen. It has a very flexible tip that is easy to fray! These pens are also not very cheap, that’s why it may be better to begin with an easier pen & work your way up to this one! I will say this though, I love the Tombow Dual Brush very much. It is easily one of my favorite pens & I love the (what seems) infinite color options. I absolutely recommend this pen, but I would say proceed with caution & use soft paper (I’ll talk more about this later, but basically look for a Rhodia notepad)

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Hopefully you’ve found this information helpful as you’re on the beginning of your lettering journey. I would love to hear about YOUR favorite brush pens! Am I missing some? Please let me know! Either leave your thoughts in the comments OR you can email me at lyssarts@gmail.com.

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